Latest Articles

  • BIPOC Excellence Passed Over For White Mediocrity: Golden Globes 2021 – Op Ed
    When the Golden Globe Nominees were announced this month, many took to the internet to express their outrage at the disappointing ‘snubs’ and the outrageous nominations. A common theme that most found in the nominations was that many excellent BIPOC-led movies and TV shows were ignored or not given enough attention, while mediocre white-led ones were nominated instead. Among the 40 acting nominees for TV, only two Black actors were nominated, while only two Black women were nominated across all TV and film categories. Perhaps the most shocking of the nominations was the fact that ‘I May Destroy You’, a Black-led TV show that blew up last year and explored sexual assault in a helpful and deep way, was completely ignored by the Golden Globes, while ‘Emily in Paris’, an overdone chick flick, was nominated for two awards. This is, of course, not a new phenomenon – just a few years ago, the Oscars were criticized for not having sufficiently diverse nominations, with the hashtag #OscarsSoWhite trending. But why is it so common for excellent works of art by Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) to be ignored, while mediocre projects by white artists are excessively celebrated? WRITTEN BY: Elisabeth Hoole
  • Disney’s Iwájú: The Power of Afrofuturism
    In 2017, Tolu Olowofoyeku, Hamid Ibrahim, and Fikayo Adeola, three friends from Nigeria and Uganda, found Kugali Media. Their vision was to create a pan-African media company aimed at telling stories of the African continent by Africans. They created a sci-fi Afrofuturistic comic-book called “Iwájú,” which roughly translates to “the future” in the West African language of Yoruba. 3 years later, in December of 2020, Disney announced a partnership with the company; it will be adapting the comic book into a science fiction animated series for Disney+ coming out in 2022. The show is to be set in Lagos, Nigeria and will explore issues like “class, innocence, and challenging the status quo”–themes all too relevant today. WRITTEN BY: Lucy
  • Why is Racism Towards Asians so… Normal?
    Why are derogatory phrases like ‘ching chong’ so ingrained and embedded into people’s vocabulary, and are often dismissed as harmless jokes? How does the Model Minority Myth and East Asians’ perceived proximity to whiteness act as an underlying factor?
  • An Interview With ALYSSA CARSON: 19 Year Old Future Mars Walker
    Alyssa Carson (a.k.a Nasa blueberry) was born on March 10, 2001, in Hammond, Louisiana. After watching an episode of The Backyardigans about space travel, three year old Carson told her father that she wanted to become an astronaut and visit Mars. She graduated from Baton Rouge International School, a pre-school through 12th grade private school in 2019. Currently, Carson is studying astrobiology at the Florida Institute of Technology. She previously attended classes focused on space physiology at Embry–Riddle Aeronautical University.
  • The Growing Popularity of Podcasts: Your Guide to Finding What to Binge Listen to Next
    As the world has become increasingly busier in recent years, podcasts have become one of the most popular mediums for news and entertainment for just about anyone. With about 25% of the United States population listening to podcasts weekly, they have completely swept the nation. This boom in popularity for audio content can mainly be contributed to one major advantage over reading an article or watching a video on a screen — its ability to allow listeners to multitask. From cleaning the house to driving to work, podcasts can be listened to while doing just about anything, making them extremely appealing to those constantly battling the hustle of everyday life.
  • Metamorphosis
    How small we were at first Perhaps blissfully ignorant and in matters of the world, unversed Little eggs, unbeknownst to the reckoning- The growth the not so distant future would bring
  • A DEEPER TRAVEL INTO THE FOLKLORIAN WOODS: AN ANALYSIS AND REVIEW OF TAYLOR SWIFT’S EVERMORE
    TW: mentions of mental health issues, murder On July 24, singer Taylor Swift surprised the world with her 8th studio album, folklore, an unexpected move that quickly became number 1 in sellings and streaming platforms. The release of folklore broke the pattern Swift had been following for years, building eras for her albums and leaving a span of at least two years between releases. Now, five months later, she has done it again. On December 11, Swift unexpectedly released her 9th studio album, titled evermore, as a sequel to folklore’s alternative style. On the Instagram post where she announced the record, she explained evermore is “folklore’s sister” and was born out of a prolific song-writing process where she “just couldn’t stop writing songs”. The escapism she felt when telling these stories and the warm welcome the fans gave to them encouraged her and her team to keep exploring this theme.
  • Don’t make jokes at the expense of Texans: understand the importance of reliable infrastructure.
    With the rise of online criticism of conservative beliefs, figures, and news outlets has come a new form of “activism” that extends these criticisms into a mockery of red states. Even more, this has formed a new belief that red states and the people who inhabit them deserve to be the punchline of all “jokes” because of who the majority of people in those states vote for; this discounts the minority communities in each of these states that not only suffer because of their states’ legislators, but now are placed in a position where they are forced to hear about how everyone in their state deserves the lot they receive in life. It disregards the blatant voter suppression that these states imposed on marginalized voters and fails to recognize that not everyone living in a red state aligns with conservative beliefs. Making online jokes surrounding the unfortunate circumstances of red states was a common practice after Florida was declared a red state in the 2020 presidential election, which placed the state at the mercy of various hurricane and natural disaster jokes, and is now becoming commonplace following the spike in Texas winter storms and record freezing temperatures.
  • A Different Perspective on Medusa’s Story: a Feminist Retelling of a Greek Myth
    In Greek, the word ‘Medusa’ symbolizes guardian, or protectress. Athena herself wears the Gorgoneion, an amulet with a gorgon’s face, as a protective pendant. So why, when learning of all the stories about Medusa, is she seen as evil, or someone who needs her head chopped off? When Medusa’s name and self has the meaning of a guardian, why is she depicted as someone the world needs to be guarded from? That Medusa, the only mortal gorgon, is to be feared, and Perseus did right by decapitating her?
  • The COVID-19 Vaccine
    As we move forward in this pandemic, more and more people are becoming sick with COVID-19, with many dying as well. Thankfully, scientists from around the world have come together to collaborate on vaccines, 2 of which are already being rolled out in the United States.
  • Groundbreaking Gen Z BIPOC Actresses
    The film industry has required progress since its beginning, especially when it comes to its inclusion– or lack thereof. Even though this milestone of goal is still in the process of being reached, we can thank Rita Moreno, Cicely Tyson, Yalitza Aparicio, and so many other women who have opened the floodgates for BIPOC actresses to showcase their talents on the big screen. Generation Z has been making strides towards continuing to break that glass ceiling – actresses like Sofia Wylie, Madison Reyes, Avantika Vandanapu, Josie Totah, and so many more are proof of that.
  • Dear Gen Z, AAVE is not “Internet Slang.”
    “It’s the AAVE for me,” “Chile, anyways,” “We been knew,” “Finna,” “Periodt, “No cap,” Well, aside from being ingrained in “Internet culture” and often incorrectly referred to as “Gen Z slang,” “internet lingo” or “stan language,” they’re all rooted in AAVE – African American Ventricular English. AAVE is an established, recognized system of linguistics and a dialect of English natively spoken by Black communities, notably in the United States and Canada. WRITTEN BY: Cil
  • Register for the Women of Color Conference!
    2021 is finally here and #ItsOurYear! The Women of Color Conference is giving girls the tools to live up to this claim. Through career panels, grants, and mentorship programs, we aim to inspire young women to never limit themselves, but instead to reach for the stars and land among them. Through our conference community, we’ll remind them that no matter what they’ve gone through in 2020, they can use their voice to illuminate a brighter future. 2021 is the year of the black and brown girl; it’s the year for us all to be loud, make change, and thrive.
  • How Gen Z Students Can Study “Smarter, Not Harder”
    Burnout is often a result of work-induced stress, and for Gen. Z students, this fact is constantly applicable. Although work is a huge factor of burnout for adults over the age of twenty-four, teens and young adults often find that their source of burnout stems from school. Oftentimes, students are forced to prioritize homework, classes, and Zoom calls over their mental health. To provide mental clarity, one should always prioritize mental health above any assigned work.
  • Diversity in Disney: A Tale as Old as Time
    Beauty and the Beast, Cinderella, and The Little Mermaid. These are all classic stories that were brought to life by the Walt Disney Studios. For almost a century, they have dazzled audiences old and young with these tales of fantasy. But what do they all have in common? Their stories are centered on thin white beauties. This is not to claim there is an issue with that, but when you look at the expanseous vault of Disney movies, you can easily deduce that characters of color are painfully absent. WRITTEN BY: Evie Fitzpatrick
  • The Evolution of African American Music in America
    The cultural influences of the African American community have not only shaped American culture, but rather the entire world; with influences ranging from fashion, the arts, to even agriculture, African Americans rarely receive recognition for their contributions that are all stored in the National Museum of African American History and Culture. In what is known to be a ‘universal language’ that unites individuals of all demographics, music has historically been a symbol of hope and integrity for African Americans. From what began as a way to bond with fellow slaves while easing the drudgery of their lives, music has flourished into a pivotal component of America’s overall cultural heritage. Their dance tunes, religious music, and hip hop influences makes it nearly impossible to envision America without African American influence.
  • Black History Month
    Black History Month started at a Chicago festival celebrating the 50th anniversary of the emancipation of enslaved people. Carter Woodson observed this festival, and opened up a Black history booth during the 3 week duration of the celebration. Soon after the festival ended, he decided to form the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (Now changed to Association for the Study of African American Life and History).
  • AI, Racism, and Society
    In a fiery spoken-word piece performed by Joy Buolamwini, she asks artificial intelligence a simple question: “Often forgetting to deal with// Gender, race, and class, again I ask Ain’t I a Woman?” This sentiment rings true as visuals play of multiple high profile black women, such as Michelle Obama, Oprah Winfrey, and Serena Williams, being misidentified by various facial recognition software. The AI jumps to the conclusion that they are all men. This situation is evidence of underlying racial bias, and it’s not an isolated incident; racial bias is persistent in AI. WRITTEN BY: Lucy Damachi
  • Growing up with the Internet
    Gen-Z is a generation that is utterly obsessed with our phones and screens. We are a part of a generation that was born into the unknown and pushed into the abyss of the internet. Our developing years were spent having to choose between living in the moment and getting lost in our technology. We turned out fine though, right?
  • Gimme Love: Joji’s Influence on Gen Z
    From his days on Harlem Shake to holding records on the Billboard, Joji has swept the world with his heartfelt lyrics and irresistible beats in just the past few years. Joji has now become an inspiration for young Asian-Americans around the globe. Born in Osaka, his Japanese background shines as a token of hope and pride for young AAPI youth. Underneath the company, 88rising, with fellow artists such as Niki, Rich Brian, and Stephanie Poetri, Joji has helped make a name for Asians in the mainstream music industry. His greatest feat came with his album, Ballads 1, when he became the first AAPI artist to claim the #1 title on Billboard’s R&B/Hip-Hop chart.
  • Why Mental Health Issues Disproportionately Affect the LGBTQIA+ Community
    4.5% of adults in the US identify as LGBTQIA+ as of 2017. 39% of those people suffer from mental health issues – that is 5.8 million people. It is really important to know that identifying as LGBTQIA+ is NOT a mental illness or disorder. Everyone has a sexual orientation and gender identity. People who identify differently than the majority of the population fall under the term LGBTQIA+. Although being LGBTQIA+ is absolutely not a mental illness, more LGBTQIA+ people experience mental health problems than their “straight” counterparts. This is mostly due to the shame, fear, discimination, and traumatic events they have to face due to how they identify. Discrimination against LGBTQ+ persons has been associated with high rates of psychiatric disorders, substance abuse, and suicide. Many people who identify as LGBTQIA+ are also part of other marginalized communities. This adds the potential for xenophobia, racism, ableism, ageism, sexism, and much more to homophobia or transphobia they already have to face. WRITTEN BY: Eliza Cline
  • Let’s Talk About: Gaming
    Video games have been around since 1958, and as the years go by with improved technology, playing video games has become a very popular hobby or leisure activity amongst everybody, no matter the age or generation. As of October 2020, there have been 3.07 billion active video gamers worldwide on many different platforms such as computers, consoles, mobile phones, TVs and others. WRITTEN BY: Emily Yeap
  • Intersectionality in Activism: The Need to Support Black Transgender People
    Social movements are increasingly realizing the importance of intersectionality – the understanding that every person’s different identities (their race, gender, class, sexuality, etc.) work together to define their unique experience in society. Until the importance of intersectionality was acknowledged, activists believed that a win for a marginalized group meant a win for everyone in that group, regardless of their other identities that might work against them gaining equal benefits. However, despite increasingly intersectional discourse, even current social movements fail to include all identities successfully. WRITTEN BY: Elisabeth Mahilini Hoole
  • The Rise of Young Adult Literature
    “Young Adult literature,” “Youth literature,”  and “Y.A.” are all examplesContinue reading “The Rise of Young Adult Literature”
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